Sesho's Anime And Manga Reviews
My main focus is reviewing manga and anime, but I also review Japanese literature, movies, and videogames. Basically, if it has anything to do with Japan, I'll talk about it, along with a dash of Korea and China.

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  • VAMPYBIT.ME - The official Linda Le Weblog

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  • For 24 hours on Saturday, January 2, the first part of the Halo anime project, "Origins I" will be available for free viewing on Xbox Live's Halo Waypoint. This first short is being animated by Japan's revered Studio 4C (Tekkonkinkreet, Batman: Gotham Knight, Steamboy). This is a world premiere so it will be the first time anyone will be getting a look at a full short instead of just trailers. Origins focuses on the background history of Halo the game universe, showing the Forerunners and their battle against The Flood. Origins will be available in either Japanese (subtitled?) or English. Or course this is all part of a larger anthology entitled "Halo Legends" which is being produced along with other top Japanese anime studios like Production IG, Bones, and Toei.

    I don't pride myself on being much of a Halo fan. I've only played about half of the first game.  I never had the original Xbox console so I kinda missed the whole phenomenon. But I AM an anime fan so I'm quite excited about this project, even though the earlier Batman: Gotham Knight was a bit lackluster. It was still cool to see another perspective looking at very familiar characters which American viewers have become very jaded about. Halo doesn't quite bring as much baggage to the table as Batman so I expect it to be even more fresh. And who knows, it might get me to finish playing Halo and progress to the other two games in the series.

    Here's the trailer for Origins I:

    Category:Video -- posted at: 1:56pm CST

    Anime DVD Review: Heroic Age, Episodes 8-13

    Anime dvd review of Heroic Age: The Complete Series Part 1, Episodes 8-13. Directed by Takashi Noto. Series Composition by Tow Ubukata. Music by Naoki Sato. Published by Funimation. List Price: $59.98, Rated 13+.

    The Argonaut continues to flee to the new human homeworld as the Azz-Azoth fleet under Nilval tries to hold off the Silver and Gold Tribe armadas. Things could get messy as Nodos Mehitak shows up to take down the Azz-Azoth. Meanwhile, Bellcross and Karkinos are still locked in battle. Their fight is not measured in minutes or days, but weeks! Like a rumble between two gods. Dhianeila's two scheming and arrogant brothers try to commandeer leadership of the human forces through bribery and extortion. They begin to move along their plan for all-out war against the Gold and Silver Tribes, with the ultimate end goal of recapturing Earth. Problem is that Meleagros, the scion of the family,  is a tad bit power hungry and isn't shy about sacrificing his own forces or even entire planets if it furthers the glory and power of him and his family.

    I really love the epic space opera feel of Heroic Age. When we have fleets battling each other here, it isn't just a couple of ships on each side. It's thousands, if not TENS of thousands involved. And when you're talking about the insect-like swarms of the Gold Tribes, it could be MILLIONS! It's war the likes of which we reality-bound humans can hardly imagine. And then you have the jockeying forces of the politics within each tribe (except the Gold) as the humans try to decide the best course of action. There are even factions in the Vulcan-like Silver that believe the universe is big enough for Silver and Iron while others think the humans should be destroyed.

    The problems I have with this show are two: one major and one minor. The first is that the battles between the Nodos lack any impact or drama. All the Nodos are completely rendered in CG and are not animated very well, moving very stiffly and awkwardly. They are supposed to be living creatures but they move like robots. The director should have looked at some of the old Evangelion fight scenes or Eureka 7 to learn how to handle this properly. Sadly, I almost wish to jettison the whole giant monster facet of the show.  

    One minor complaint is in the character designs and costumes. The characters look too much like they fell out of a Gundam series, or even Fafner. The costumes of the humans are dull and boring with too much whiteness splashed with some second-thought colors.  It doesn't look like too much effort was spent on their uniforms.

    My Grade: B+

    Listen to my podcast review of the first seven episodes:

    http://sesho.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=515827

    Direct download: heroic_age_1.jpg
    Category:Anime DVD Reviews -- posted at: 1:27pm CST

    Podcast Episode 198: Butterflies, Flowers Volume 1

    Podcast manga review of Butterflies, Flowers volume 1 by Yuki Yoshihara. Translated by Tetsuichiro Miyaki. Adapted by Nancy Thistlewaite. Originally published in Japan by Shogakukan. Published in US by Viz Shojo Beat, $9.99, Rated M for Mature.

    From the back cover:

    Choko Kuze is the sensible daughter of a venerable family who went bankrupt. She joins a real estate company as an entry-level office worker, but her eccentric boss is harder on her than anyone else in the company! After hearing him inadvertently call her "milady," she realizes he was the young servant boy she knew as a child. At work he's a tyrant, but after hours he insists on treating her like a lady of the nobility. Is romance even possible for a couple locked in such a crazy role reversal?

    My Grade: A+

     

    Direct download: Episode_198--Butterflies_Flowers_volume_1.mp3
    Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:09pm CST

    Podcast Episode 197: Dragonaut The Resonance,  Episodes 1-7

    Podcast anime dvd review of Episodes 1-7 of Dragonaut: The Resonance Complete Series Part I. Directed by Manabu Ono. Character Designs by Makoto Uno (Gravion, Witchblade, Love Hina). Released by Funimation.

    From the back cover:

    With a deadly asteroid hurtling towards Earth, sexy human Dragonauts in tight uniforms and their curvaceous dragon companions come together to create a formidable fighting force with all the right moves. Caught in the middle of this race against time are Jin - a heartbroken young flyboy, and Toa - a voluptuous mystery woman with an amazing set of intergalactic battle skills. Jin's down about the fate of his doomed planet, but Toa is quick to grab him by the seat of his pants and lift his sagging spirits. If these star-crossed space cadets can unlock the secrets of their mysterious connection and convince the Dragonauts to join the action, there may yet be hope for planet Earth!

    My Grade: B

    Watch the entire series for free at:

    http://www4.funimation.com/video/?page=video&v=2850

    View the trailer for the first box set here:

    Direct download: Episode_197--_Dragonaut.mp3
    Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:07pm CST

    Manga Review: Inukami! Volume 2

    Manga review of Inukami! volume 2. Story by Mamizu Arisawa and art by Mari Matsuzawa. Translated by Anastasia Moreno. Adapted by Lorelei Laird. Originally published in Japan by Media Works. Published in US by Tor/Seven Seas, $9.99, rated Older Teen 16+.

    Volume 2 ended with the arrival of Nadeshiko, a pacifist Inukami who serves Keita's cousin, Kawahira. She has been sent to stay for a week to teach Yoko how to be an obedient and polite young lady (actually, dog spirit). For reasons we don't know, Yoko was neverly properly instructed on how to be a proper Inukami. We also find out in this volume that Kawahira family members can have more than one Inukami, according to their spiritual powers. Kaoru is one such multiple master and his other Inukami want Nadeshiko to stay with Yoko and Keita because she refuses to fight the Jarei. Of course, you know Yoko isn't going to settle for sharing Keita so she becomes their enemy. Kaoru's team decides to fight back with their cutest member, the cute and diminutive Tomohane, who brings Yoko super-strength laxative laced cupcakes, which Keita proceeds to eat! Things get even more complicated as a "Mujina", a badger spirit, shows up carrying a lethal infectious disease called "Mujina Hiccups". The Hiccups can kill an Inukami.

    The thing that sticks out the most in my mind when I think if Inukami is the fact that the series is so hilarious. Some of the funniest scenes in this volume have to do with the cupcakes and the mujina. In order to get a vaccine for the Hiccups, a blood sample must be obtained from the mujina. But the little badger has the power to fuse things together to aid in its escape. Some of the characters get fused to Keita just as he feels he has to let a nuclear #2 rip. One of the most horrifying and funny scenes in the book is seeing a screaming Tomohane holding on to the doorframe of the bathroom as she desperately tries to keep Keita from dragging her in to the toilet (her leg is fused to his). The art is cute, comedic, airy, and always elegant, but never stuffy. Mari Matsuzawa has a real knack for interesting panel layout that never gets cluttered or confusing. The characters are great as well. It's so easy to settle into cardboard with a series like this but all of the characters have a warmth and authenticity about them that makes the reader feel like they are real people.

    My Grade: A+

    You can listen to my podcast of the first volume at this link:

    http://www.sesho.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=406613

    Here's the link to read the first chapter of Volume 1 for free:

     http://www.gomanga.com/mv/index.php?series=inukami&page=1

    Direct download: inukami_2.jpg
    Category:Manga Reviews -- posted at: 1:54pm CST

    Manga Review: Honey Hunt Volume 3

    Manga review of Honey Hunt Volume 3 by Miki Aihara. Translated by Ari Yasuda. Adapted by Liz Forbes. Originally published in Japan by Shogakukan. Published in US by Viz Shojo Beat, $9.99, Rated T+ for Older Teen.

    Yura is still a bundle of nerves as she gets ready for the second script reading of the next "Noodle Girl" episode. Things get worse as she loses a contact lens, or so she thinks, but the loss might be the key to her regaining her confidence. Her lovelife gets more complicated as Q-Ta leaves for England for a month long recording session. Even if he had remained in Japan, Keiichi, Yura's manager, has forbidden him to have contact with Yura. This does allow an opening for the increasingly smitten Haruka to try to squirm into Yura's heart. He believes that if Yura sees him performing with his band, Knights, she will fall in love with him. But this is Haruka we're talking about, a dude that doesn't want to show that he's falling for her. Knowing that Yura wants to know more about Q-Ta, he dangles the carrot of telling her everything there is to know about his twin brother...IF she can get tickets to the Knights 3-evening engagement at the Tokyodome. Problem is, all three shows are sold out.

    A couple of reviews back I asked myself whether I would be able to continue reading this series. The reason I asked myself this was because I had a lot of hostility to Aihara's art. It just isn't that good. Yura is especially unappealing, looking like a giant lost fishhead  most of the time. But in a little afterword at the end of this volume, Aihara insinuates that she purposefully designed Yura as "plain". Now things are making a bit more sense. Aihara is going to goad Yura to succeed even if she isn't a "classic" model level beauty. She's gonna have to get by with her spirit, determination, and inner spark. She not only has to win over the characters in the book, but also the reader! I for one really admire her as she has developed more and more of a backbone, starting with telling her parents to go to Hell on TV back in the first volume. She not only refuses to stand in the shadow of her famous parents (especially her mom), she wants to exceed them! That would be like Julian Lennon saying he's going to write better songs and sell more records than John Lennon. It takes a lot of courage to say something like that, much less do it. I really like this story. I'm still trying to figure out if Q-Ta likes Yura or is more in love with her dad. And is Haruka really falling for her or is he just trying to take something away from his bro? Excellent shojo.

    My Grade: A

    Direct download: honey_hunt_3.jpg
    Category:Manga Reviews -- posted at: 7:03pm CST

    Yep, here we have it. The very definition of weirdness. What you have is a dude dressed up in a Michael Myers jumpsuit and a Jason hockey mask cutting up huge logs with a giant chainsaw (I guess that means he's taking inspiration from Leatherface as well?). Anyway, the video shows the process of how he carves these logs into an anime character. It runs about 9 minutes. I would watch the beginning and the end (where he makes her wings). In the middle we briefly see that this guy is really skilled at woodcarving with more traditonal tools and religious motifs. I have no idea who the winged girl is that he makes. She looks a bit like KOS-MOS from Xenosaga. Does anybody know who the figure is of? Also reminds me that I need to do a podcast review for Kannagi! Are you not entertained?

    Category:Video -- posted at: 12:53pm CST

    Podcast Episode 196: Fullmetal Alchemist Volume 5

    Podcast manga review of Fullmetal Alchemist Volume 5 by Hiromu Arakawa. Translated by Akira Watanabe. Adapted by Jake Forbes. Originally published in Japan by Square Enix. Published in US by Viz, $9.99, Rated T for Teen.

    From the back cover:

    In an alchemical ritual gone wrong, Edward Elric lost his arm and his leg, and his brother Alphonse became nothing but a soul in a suit of armor. Equipped with mechanical "auto-mail" limbs, Edward becomes a state alchemist, seeking the one thing that can restore his brother and himself...the legendary Philosopher's Stone.

    Ed, Alphonse, and the mechanic Winry go south in search of Izumi Curtis, the master alchemist who taught the brothers how to use alchemy. But in the boomtown of Rush Valley, an encounter with a pickpocket turns them down a different path in search of an auto-mail blacksmith whose handiwork is the best that Winry has ever seen. Then the action flashes back to show how Ed and Alphonse first learned alchemy...

    My Grade: A+

    Direct download: Episode_196--_Fullmetal_Alchemist_volume_5.mp3
    Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:30pm CST

    Manga Review: Negima! Volume 5

    Manga review of Negima! Volume 5 by Ken Akamatsu. Translated and adapted by Douglas Varenas. Originally published in Japan by Kodansha. Published in US by Del Rey, $10.95, Rated OT 16+.

    Now that Kazumi, the leader of the Journalism Club, has decided to keep Negi's secret, she's in kahoots with resident weasel pervert Chamo in an effort to increase Negi's probationary contracts. She instigates "Operation Kiss Negi-kun Passionately on This School Field Trip". She splits the girls into pairs and tells them that whoever kisses Negi without getting caught by the other faculy members gets them on the limited edition trading cards that are a prize among his class. Of course, MOST of them don't know that they will also be entering into a magic contract at the same time to help Negi in battle. Unfortunately for them, there is now more than one Negi. Negi made some paper doll copies of himself so he could go out on patrol without being missed. But some of the copies are defective and want to get it on with his students! Meanwhile, elements of the Kansai Magic Association that do not want peace begin to make their moves to stop Negi from fulfilling his mission to deliver a letter of conciliation from his magic school.

    Negima is nothing if not entertaining. Again, the art is great, with Akamatsu making sure that things never get too serious. Even when Negi battles with a powerful fox spirit and gets the snot beat out of him, it never gets to the Naruto stabbing and cutting off heads realm. Akamatsu is about showing pretty girls and panties and he never misses an opportunity to showcase them. He really is a master of character design even if his plots steal from other better known Japanese and Western franchises. I enjoy each volume of Negima, but see little reason to ever pick up the new Negima Neo series. One time around with this story and characters is quite enough for me.

    My Grade: B+

    Direct download: Negima.jpg
    Category:Manga Reviews -- posted at: 12:02pm CST

    Somehow, when I saw a headline on MSN.com titled "Man Marries Virtual Wife", the first thing that crossed my mind was "he's gotta be Japanese". I don't know, there's just this weird sense of unreality that pervades Japanese weirdos that cannot be found anywhere else in the world. I mean, where has all the machismo gone? These dudes used to test out their katanas on live convicts! Now they're practicing perverted acts with moe throw pillows. Apparently, a Japanese man decided to marry Nene Anegasaki, a character from a Nintendo DS game called Love Plus. Here's a video report from Boing Boing editor Lisa Katayama:

    And here's the promo for the Love Plus game:

    Category:Video -- posted at: 11:35am CST